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Rare Money Blog

By Christopher Dahncke, Currency Auction Associate

​Our March 2021 Las Vegas sale features an exciting array of United States currency, from marbled edge Continental notes to high denomination Federal Reserve Notes. One of my personal favorites in the sale is lot 3527 from the Tarzan Collection, an 1875 $50 National from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania in PMG Choice Extremely Fine 45 grade.

By Ben Mahaffey, Web Content Manager

​As a lover of the Betts Medal series, I am excited to show off this rare and historic 1773 Carib War Medal. Cast in Silver, and in Mint State, this looped specimen will be featured in Stack’s Bowers Galleries March 2021 Las Vegas Auction as Lot 1006.

By Christopher Dahncke, Currency Auction Associate

​The April 2021 Hong Kong sale contains a nice array of world paper money, including many treasures that have been off the market for decades. Lot 40234 presents one such item, a 1 Yuan “Black Dragon” Kwangsi Bank note. This is an exciting opportunity to acquire a very desirable and coveted piece of world paper. Among the most significant Chinese pieces in all of numismatics, this "Black Dragon" note is the sole graded on PMG's census and is without question the finest example we have ever seen.

By Jeremy Bostwick, Senior Numismatist and Cataloger

​Among the most intriguing areas of numismatics are those that pose the question "what if?" While rarities of famous leaders are coveted and exceptionally desirable, those that shouldn't have been issued in the first place are even more interesting. One such example of a world-class rarity with tremendous historical importance crosses the auction block as part of the incredible Pinnacle Collection in our April Hong Kong sale. Issued for the would-be emperor, Constantine Pavlovich, the fabled pattern ruble is the only coin produced for this reign that never really happened.

By James McCartney, Senior Numismatist and Consignment Director

​As the young American economy began to flourish in the early 19th century, deposits of silver bullion at the Mint increased. The hiatus of the silver dollar beginning in 1804 meant that the half dollar was the largest silver denomination available, and it was embraced as the backbone to commerce for the three decades to follow. From a start of just 750,000 Capped Bust half dollars struck in 1807, mintages quickly rose into seven figures. By 1825, mintages had twice surpassed 2 million and nearly 3 million would be struck for 1825. Even so, the vast majority of these pieces were placed into circulation, saw heavy use, and were melted over the following century.

By Stack's Bowers Galleries

​See if you can answer this week's Test Your Knowledge correctly. Who is the woman depicted in this image, and why was she important to numismatics?

By Q. David Bowers, Co-Founder

​There is no better way to begin this commentary than by quoting an excerpt from an  article by Paterson Dubois, “Our Mint and Engravers,”  which appeared in the American Journal of Numismatics, July 1883, pages 12-16: 

“William Barber, fifth engraver of the Mint, was born in London, May 2, 1807. He learned his profession from his father, John Barber, and was employed on silver plate work; he also worked for De La Rue & Co, in making dies for embossing cards and labels.

By Stack's Bowers Galleries

​This week Stack’s Bowers Galleries posted at StacksBowers.com the March Collectors Choice Online Auctions that will take place March 10. These three sales include United States Currency, Bullion and Semi-Numismatic Coins, and United States Coins. The sales comprise nearly 1,000 lots, with the bulk included in the coin session.

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